Thiakry

Thiakry

Sweets, Uncategorized | April 14, 2017 | By

The first time I saw Thiakry (pronounced cha-kry) at a Senegalese restaurant, I won’t lie, I kind of gave it a side eye. It looked like a boring porridge that was another version of tapioca, and I was guessed that I would not like it… was  I extra wrong. My friend who grew up eating Senegalese food was there with me, and ignored my skepticism and ordered the Thiakry anyway. Thank God for food envy, my longathroat led me to try her Thiakry, and I was sold since then.

Sweet Ras El Hanout

Sweet Ras El Hanout

Uncategorized | April 8, 2017 | By

 

Disclaimer: I know I claim to love a lot of foods and cuisines, but I am telling truth. It is the life I have come to embrace as a food enthusiast. Its a tough life, because it means you have the most peculiar and super specific cravings sometimes. That said, I love Moroccan food. I will let you know a little later about my sentimental connection to Moroccan food, but today, I will be sharing one of my favorite Moroccan spices:  Ras El Hanout.

Not your average fish and chips recipe

Not your average fish and chips recipe

Uncategorized | April 3, 2017 | By

While preparing this fish and chips dish, I couldn’t help but think of my parents. Growing up, seafood was a big part of my life, not just because I ate it a lot, but because there are so many memories surrounding fish and chips and other seafood dishes that I would never forget in a hurry. My mother is originally from a riverine area of Nigeria, so seafood was always a tradition for her. I imagine that marrying my dad meant she got to share tons of interesting recipes with him because by the time I came around, my dad had already fallen in love with seafood himself.

Nigerian Eggplant/Garden Egg Stew

Nigerian Eggplant/Garden Egg Stew

Uncategorized | March 29, 2017 | By

I love when my mom or my mother-in-law (aka my other mom) come over to my home to spend sometime with me. I always learn a ton from them, especially in the kitchen and in the market place. On a recent visit from my mother-in-law, I re-discovered my love for eggplant / garden egg stew. My mom and I went to an Asian market that had tons of produce, we were picking out vegetables when we spotted some Thai-eggplants or as we call them at home garden-eggs. We decided to pick them up and make a simple yet delicious eggplant stew.

Earl Grey Cake with Hibiscus Frosting

Earl Grey Cake with Hibiscus Frosting

Uncategorized | March 21, 2017 | By

I love cake! Can you tell? This year, I resolved to learn how to make great cakes, and this is my learning platform, so I thought I’d start with one of my favorites: earl grey cakes. Everyone who knows me, also knows that I absolutely love my teas. I am not talking about the simple yellow label stuff, but interesting fruit, herbal and unusual teas that have complex flavors you can enjoy without milk or sugar. Two of my favorite teas are earl grey tea and a hibiscus tea that is commonly known as ‘zobo’ in Nigeria (also called Sorrel or bissap depending on where you’re from). If you’re looking to try that out by the way, I have a recipe for some refreshing hibiscus iced tea right here.

I have tea and cake all the time, and I love both of them together not just separately, so a “stroke of genius” (not really, more like hunger) hit me one day: what is the best way to enjoy both my loves at one time? A Tea cake! Today, I am sharing the recipe created from two of my favorite teas: an earl grey cake with a creamy hibiscus frosting  all in one cake. The result was a delectable hibiscus frosted, earl grey cake, which I seriously hope you get to try because of how delicious it is. Who knew you could create something so good out of earl grey and zobo? If you end up making it, let me know how you get along. You might have to make an excess of hibiscus frosting because if you’re like me, you’ll be licking a lot of the frosting before it even gets on the cake!

Secrets to a stable and flaky meat pie crust

Secrets to a stable and flaky meat pie crust

Uncategorized | March 16, 2017 | By


cut out of a meat pie with stuffing

I don’t know about you guys, but I am often very disappointed with the meat pie offerings at many of our African parties or weddings.  Eagerly anticipating the promise of various finger foods or “small chops” as we call them, I quickly spot the meat pie stash on a tray and proceed to grab one with the promise of the savory meaty goodness, only to bite into a mediocre filling and bready crust. Since my last meat pie recipe (which I admit was a bit standard… still great, but not a knock out), I have been toiling in the kitchen to bring you all the best fail-proof meat pie recipe. My requirements for perfection are:

  • A stable crust. I have no problems with flaky crusts especially since I am used to making flaky puff pastry, but I need the crust to be more stable. Regular puff pastry would be too delicate for this recipe most of the time.
  • Flaky crust. I also need the crust to be light and airy. I love meat pies, but tough dough pies are not my speed.

Jollof Couscous in 20 Minutes!

Jollof Couscous in 20 Minutes!

Uncategorized | February 25, 2017 | By

Hello people of the world! Today I have for you one of the most impressive, fancy looking but easy recipes to share. For those who have had the privilege of experiencing the deliciousness that is Jollof rice, for those who have never had Jollof rice, but want to jazz up their meals, for those who don’t really care… for anyone who can eat food, this recipe is for you.

Jollof couscous garnished with grape tomatoes and green onions with a plate of goat meat on the side

Sombi: Senegalese Coconut Rice Pudding

Sombi: Senegalese Coconut Rice Pudding

 

Sombi (Senegalese coconut rice pudding), is my favorite type of rice pudding. It is traditionally served warm, however in the warmer months it can also be served cold. Let me tell you why I serve it cold sometimes and how to make it.

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