Jerk Turkey Wings – A Delicious Thanksgiving Alternative

These delicious Jerk turkey wings are an alternative take on classic thanksgiving turkey that’ll have you and your family and friends craving for more!

Jerk Turkey Wings

Recently, I visited New York for a mini culinary exploration, and if you have been following me on Instagram (you should if you aren’t) you would have seen that one of the culinary highlights of my mini vacation was in Crown Heights. Crown Heights (specifically Nostrand Avenue, Brooklyn) is home to what in my opinion is the best Caribbean food in New York, and I might even say in the U.S. I am not 100 percent certain of course, but I challenge you to tell me of a neighborhood with better Caribbean food… mind you this won’t be easy as I have sampled a large variety of Caribbean foods from a ton of other neighborhoods! The diversity of Caribbean culture there is also quite refreshing, there is a Bajan restaurant next to a Jamaican restaurant, a few steps away from a Trini bakery; I could go on and on. This trip inspired one of the dishes I will be serving for Thanksgiving this year: Jerk turkey wings, in a delicious alternative take on thanksgiving turkey that will have you and your friends craving for more!

Nigerian Beans Porridge (Ewa Oloyin)

Nigerian beans porridge is the definition of complete comfort and can be paired with garri (cassava flakes), bread or ogi (fermented, corn starch porridge)

Nigerian Beans Porridge (Ewa Oloyin) - 3 dishes of the delicious beans porridge and a pot

For the longest time, I thought of comfort food as familiar and mostly unhealthy food that makes us feel good. I have recently adjusted my idea of what comfort food should be… you just need to feel good eating it. Whether you get comfort from the cold bland crunch of an iceberg lettuce salad, or the juicy and greasy bite of a perfectly deep fried chicken, comfort food can be anything for anyone. For me this Nigerian beans porridge is the definition of complete comfort, especially on a cold fall evening.

Nigerian Akara: West African Black Eyed Pea Fritters

Akara is a tasty fried black eyed pea fritter that can be served by itself, a side of pap, with cold soaked garri, custard, porridge oats or in a burger.

Nigerian Akara: West African Black Eyed Pea Fritters - Akara fresh from fryer

The other day I shared my recipe for Moi moi, and if you recall, I said that Moi moi was one of my favorites, but that I had other dishes that were also on my favorite list. Akara is another favorite of mine and is quite easy to make. Nigerian Akara is similar to Moi moi, but unlike Moi moi that is steamed, Akara are fried black eyed pea fritters. The texture and taste of Akara and Moi moi are worlds apart, but they use very similar ingredients.

Moin Moin/Moi Moi Recipe: Steamed Black Eyed Peas Pudding

Moi moi (also called moin moin) is a delicious, savory steamed bean pudding made commonly in Nigeria from a mixture of blended black eyed peas or beans, peppers, onions, and spices.

Moin-Moin/Moi Moi Recipe: Steamed Black Eyed Peas Pudding - moin moin dished on a plate

Not too long ago, if you asked me what my favorite food was, I would have said Moi moi, hands down. Nowadays, I have a handful of favorite foods, but Moi moi remains close to the top of the list. Moi moi (also called moin moin) is a  delicious, savory steamed bean pudding made commonly in Nigeria from a mixture of blended black eyed peas or beans, peppers, onions, and spices.  This moin moin/moi moi recipe uses smoked trout, but you can switch it out for any other cooked fish, corned beef, boiled eggs, or omit the animal protein altogether and make it vegan.

Groundnut Soup (Spicy Nigerian Peanut Stew)

Groundnut soup (also called peanut stew) is a common but delicious Nigerian delicacy which is commonly eaten with rice, a starch like eba or pounded yam.

Groundnut Soup (Spicy Nigerian Peanut Stew) - Delicious groundnut stew dished with three wraps of eba

Groundnut soup is what peanut stew is commonly called in Nigeria. It is a nutty, savory, spicy and totally delicious peanut stew usually eaten with a starch like rice or eba. Peanut stews differ considerably by region, so I look forward to sharing with everyone my discoveries of its different variations. I tasted my first groundnut soup as a child in Lagos, Nigeria and… it was terrible! It was really bad guys, I can’t lie. After that first time, it was years till I found my love for groundnut soup or peanut stew again. Let me tell you the story…

Jollof Spaghetti: Easy, Classy and Delicious!

Am I one of those people that turns everything into jollof….? Maybe. But it’s delicious, so it doesn’t really matter. My goal in making this jollof spaghetti recipe was to make sure it tasted like jollof, not spaghetti and sauce, and if I have to say so myself: I nailed it.

Jollof Spaghetti - bon appetit

Some people have asked me for my jollof rice recipe; to those I say, “hold please”. I, just like most other west Africans love jollof rice, but sometimes, I want a quick and easy jollof flavor that does not require me making jollof rice. In came my jollof couscous that takes only 20 minutes to prepare. I then became low-key addicted to quick and easy jollof recipes. I have also always loved pasta, so the no-brainer next step was to make a jollof spaghetti. My goal in making this recipe was to make sure it tasted like jollof, not spaghetti and sauce, and if I have to say so myself: I nailed it.

Thieboudienne: Senegalese Jollof Rice and Fish

As a Nigerian myself, I thought that nothing could rival Nigerian food in this spot, but after I tasted the National dish of Senegal, Thieboudienne, there was a mini war for my food heart. Thieboudienne is a mouth watering rice and fish dish that is like nothing I had before.

Thieboudienne: Senegalese Jollof Rice and Fish

I am trying not to start my recipe posts with the usual “I love…”, so here goes  my attempt. Once upon a time, I was introduced to a Senegalese restaurant in downtown Baltimore by one of my dear Cameroonian friends. This trip created a soft spot in my food heart (aka my belly) for Senegalese cuisine. As a Nigerian myself, I thought that nothing could rival Nigerian food in this spot, but after I tasted the National dish of Senegal, Thieboudienne (also known as Ceebu Jen, riz au poisson, thiébou dieune, tíe biou dienne and thieb-ou-djien) , there was a mini war for my food heart. This Thieboudienne recipe is a mouth watering rice and fish dish that is like nothing I had before.

An Egusi Stew Alternative: Nigerian Almond Stew

Egusi soup is a West African dish made with a local melon seed (Egusi). I thought since Egusi is a seed and almonds are a nut, they could be similar… well I was right!

Egusi Stew Alternative: Nigerian Almond Stew - Stew served with Eba

Afro-tropical Recipes, Savory | April 24, 2017 | By

I struggled for a little while coming up with the title of this recipe. As some of you may know, this picture looks like your typical egusi soup, but it is not. I, like many people I know live in “abroad”, which means I don’t always have easy access to African ingredients. Luckily for me, I do have an African store close by, so I don’t always struggle to find my home ingredients. Truth be told, African stores don’t come close to providing as much variety as is found back home, but… it meets the needs here just fine. One day however, I ran out of Egusi (melon seeds) to make Egusi stew or Egusi soup…

Tropical Chips and Fish: A Fresh Take on the Classic!

In this alternative tropical chips & fish recipe, I serve freshly caught fried perch with fried sweet potato cubes, fried taro root, and some plantain chips.

Tropical Chips and Fish - fried perch with fried sweet potato cubes, fried taro root, and some plantain chips, ketchup and pepper mix on the side

While preparing this tropical chips and fish recipe, I couldn’t help but think of my parents. Growing up, seafood was a big part of my life, not just because I ate it a lot, but because there are so many memories surrounding fish and chips and other seafood dishes that I would never forget in a hurry. My mother is originally from a coastal area of Nigeria, so seafood was always a tradition for her. I imagine that marrying my dad meant she got to share tons of interesting recipes with him because by the time I came around, my dad had already fallen in love with seafood himself.

Easy Nigerian Eggplant/Garden Egg Stew

Eggplant/Garden Egg Stew is one of those delicious recipes I remember eating back at home with boiled yam or fried plantains on Saturday mornings.

Easy Nigerian Eggplant/Garden Egg Stew

I love when my mom or my mother-in-law (aka my other mom) come over to my home to spend sometime with me. I always learn a ton from them, especially in the kitchen and in the market place. On a recent visit from my mother-in-law, I re-discovered my love for eggplant / garden egg stew. My mom and I went to an Asian market that had tons of produce, we were picking out vegetables when we spotted some Thai-eggplants or as we call them at home, garden eggs. We decided to pick them up and make a simple yet delicious eggplant/garden egg stew.

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